Changes between Version 72 and Version 73 of TwistedDevelopment


Ignore:
Timestamp:
02/29/16 11:56:45 (6 years ago)
Author:
Adi Roiban
Comment:

Update ticket types.

Legend:

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  • TwistedDevelopment

    v72 v73  
    133133A Twisted ticket can be of one of three types.
    134134
    135   * Enhancements are used for feature additions.  These typically take the form of a new API or an expansion of an existing API.  Enhancement tickets should clearly describe the desired feature.  The more well specified a feature is, the more likely it is to be implemented (and importantly, the more likely it is that what is implemented will actually be what the reporter wanted!) and the easier it is to implement.  Remember that the ticket is possibly the only persistent record of the feature request.  If it is not self-contained and sufficiently detailed, then it will likely fail to communicate the reporter's idea, diminishing its value (possibly all the way down to zero).
    136 
    137   * Defects are used to track bugs in existing APIs.  Defect tickets are easier to specify than enhancements.  A defect should briefly describe the problem, but the bulk of the ticket should be a runnable program (ideally in the form of a unit test) which demonstrates the bug.
    138 
    139   * Regressions are similar to defects, but are for bugs which are introduced into APIs in newer releases of Twisted.  Like defect tickets, regression tickets should have a runnable program attached to demonstrate the problem.
     135  * **Enhancements** are used for feature additions.  These typically take the form of a new API or an expansion of an existing API.  Enhancement tickets should clearly describe the desired feature.  The more well specified a feature is, the more likely it is to be implemented (and importantly, the more likely it is that what is implemented will actually be what the reporter wanted!) and the easier it is to implement.  Remember that the ticket is possibly the only persistent record of the feature request.  If it is not self-contained and sufficiently detailed, then it will likely fail to communicate the reporter's idea, diminishing its value (possibly all the way down to zero).
     136
     137  * **Defects** are used to track bugs in existing APIs.  Defect tickets are easier to specify than enhancements.  A defect should briefly describe the problem, but the bulk of the ticket should be a runnable program (ideally in the form of a unit test) which demonstrates the bug.
     138
     139  * **Regressions** are similar to defects, but are for bugs which are introduced into APIs in newer releases of Twisted.  Like defect tickets, regression tickets should have a runnable program attached to demonstrate the problem.
     140
     141  * **Release blocker: regression** a ticket which blocks the release of the next Twisted version due to a regression.
     142
     143
     144  * **Release blocker: wrong release notes** a ticket which blocks the release of the next Twisted version due to a problem in the release notes.
     145
     146
     147  * **Release blocker: release process bug** a ticket which blocks the release of the next Twisted version due to a problem/issue/defect in the release process itself.
     148
    140149
    141150A ticket can have attached the following official tags [wiki:BugKeywords]